Posts Tagged ‘The Band’

For you youngsters out there, a deep cut refers to a song that was buried deeply on an album, probably somewhere toward the end of side two. The song probably wasn’t expected to be a hit, hence the song placement. Wait. Does anyone under 40-years old even know what an album is? Does LP ring a bell? Nothing? Sigh. Let us continue . . .

We all have personal favorites of a particular artist or band, songs that may have never been a hit or played on the radio. Songs that weren’t critically acclaimed but just struck a chord with you. Struck a chord, get it? Musical reference. That, my friends, is writing. Wannabe scribes take note. Anyway, it’s something that can’t be explained, that chord, that something that can bring tears to your eyes or make you want to listen to the song over and over. Sometimes the song can be something you’re afraid to admit you like.

Full disclosure: “If Since U Been Gone” by Kelly Clarkson comes on the radio, I always sing along. Killer pipes, lemme tell ya. Now THERE’S a guilty pleasure. Guilty Pleasures . . . there’s a blog idea.

Anyway, here we go. These are songs that aren’t guilty pleasures, but rather tunes that I’ve always loved but have never been recognized as their artists’ best work.

Enjoy . . .

Guilty – Alice Cooper

Sure, Alice is better known for songs like School’s Out or Eighteen, but my favorite has always been Guilty. It has a great guitar riff to open, then Alice growls out these lines:

Just tried to have fun,

Raised Hell and then some,

I’m a dirt talking , beer drinking, woman chasing minister’s son.

When I was an AD I used to include this song in my pre-game song mix. I still don’t know how I got away with it. Highly recommended. Give it a listen here. You’re welcome.

Acadian Driftwood – The Band

The Band has a ton of good songs, including The Weight and The Night They Drove Old Dixie Down, but I love Acadian Driftwood, in particular the live version on The Last Waltz. Originally recorded in 1975, it describes the forcible displacement of the Acadian people after the war between the French and the English over what is now Nova Scotia and New Brunswick, Prince Edward Island and part of Maine. Robbie Robertson’s lyrics were influenced by Longfellow’s poem Evangeline, which describes the deportation of the Acadians. Just a beautiful, haunting, intelligently written song. Here’s a link.

‘Til I Die –  The Beach Boys

Quite simply one of the most beautiful, sad, and heart wrenching songs ever recorded. I feel it’s one of the rock eras most underappreciated songs. It’s all about Brian Wilson and his slow descent into mental illness. How can you not be touched by these lyrics?

I’m a cork on the ocean

Floating over the raging sea

How deep is the ocean? How deep is the ocean?

I lost my way.

I’m a rock in a landslide

Rolling over the mountainside

How deep is the valley? How deep is the valley?

It kills my soul.

I’m a leaf on a windy day

Pretty soon I’ll be blown away

How long will the wind blow? How long will the wind blow?

These things I’ll be until I die.

Talk about a cry for help. In 45-years I have never grown tired of this song, and I’m always touched by the lyrics. Here’s the original mix. Be sure and listen all the way through.

Lay Down Burden – Brian Wilson

Another Brian Wilson tune, this is a song from his great Imagination comeback album in 1999. It’s another sad one about the death of his brother Carl, and again he lets us in on his innermost feelings:

So many years spent running away H

ow many times I wished I could stay

Too much emotion a hole in my heart

Feeling alone since we’ve been apart

And if I had the chance I’d never let you go

Just want you to know.

Lay, lay me down, lay me down

Lay down burden.

Gorgeous melody and classic Wilson harmonies as well. Sigh. Here ’tis.

One Step Up – Bruce Springsteen

Like a lot of you I’m a big Springsteen guy. If you ever see him live you’ll never forget it. Born to Run, Jungleland, Thunder Road, he has so many great songs. Still, One Step Up hits me the hardest:

Bird on a wire outside my motel room

But he ain’t singin’.

Girl in white outside a church in June

But the church bells they ain’t ringing.

I’m sittin’ here in this bar tonight But all I’m thinkin’ is . . . I’m the same old story, same old act

One step up and two steps back.

Who can’t relate to that? Here’s the video.

Ol’ 55 – The Eagles

I know this may seem like an odd choice, what with all the classic Eagles songs out there. But, if I had one Eagles song to listen to on a deserted island, this Tom Waits written release from 1973 would be my pick. It was on The Eagles 1974 album entitled On the Border, and although it isn’t an original Eagles song I still think it’s one of their best. It also happens to be the song that first introduced me to The Eagles. Check out this clip.

Junior’s Farm – Paul McCartney & Wings

This song is NEVER mentioned among Sir Paul’s greatest, but in my opinion it ranks right up there with Band On the Run, Live and Let Die, and Maybe I’m Amazed. It’s a rocker and features a searing guitar solo by Jimmy McCullough. Recorded on a farm in none other than Nashville, TN, I dare you to listen to this song without tapping your foot.

Nothingman – Pearl Jam

From 1994’s Vitology, Nothingman is one of Eddie Vedder’s best songs. Here’s his take on the lyrics. “The idea is about if you love someone and they love you, don’t fuck up…’cause you are left with less than nothing.”

Amen to that brother. Of all Pearl Jam’s tunes, this is my favorite. Close second? Alive.

Paranoid Eyes – Pink Floyd

Big Pink Floyd fan here, and I think the album this song came from, The Final Cut, is one of their most underappreciated and underrated albums ever. It was Floyd’s last album before Roger Waters vamoosed, and it’s basically all Waters all the time, which is fine by me. Check out these lyrics:

Button your lip don’t let the shield slip

Take a fresh grip on your bullet proof mask

And if they try to break down your disguise with their questions

You can hide hide hide

Behind paranoid eyes. 

You put on your brave face and slip over the road for a jar

Fixing your grin as you casually lean on the bar

Laughing too loud at the rest of the world

With the boys in the crowd

You hide hide hide

Behind petrified eyes. 

You believed in their stories of fame fortune and glory

Now you’re lost in a haze of alchohol soft middle age

The pie in the sky turned out to be miles too high

And you hide hide hide Behind brown and mild eyes.

True dat, no? Trust me, when you’re 50 you’ll get it. Here ye be.

So there ya go. I’m sure y’all have some deep cuts. Let’s hear ’em.

Originally published on April 13th, 2012.

From the legendary Last Waltz concert. “The Hawk” was the first guest to perform, and legend has it that Neil Young, after watching from the side of the stage, went backstage and told Bob Dylan, Van Morrison and the rest, “Did you hear that? Hope we can all live up to it.”

Legendary performance.