Archive for the ‘Architecture’ Category

Check it out, man. The greenhouse keeps the regular house at a comfortable 60 degrees year-around. And during the warmest parts of the summer, the glass roof automatically opens up when it hits a certain temperature to let the heat out so it doesn’t get too hot. Since they built a glass ceiling, they no longer needed a roof. So, they removed it to create a large deck for sunbathing, reading, gardening, entertaining with friends, or just hanging out. Plus, they grow all the food they need right there in the greenhouse. As if having free heat wasn’t enough, the owners have also installed a rainwater collection system for free water and a composting toilet system that provides free fertilizer for their plants. Also, the plants that thrive in their home return the favor by cleaning the air and providing more oxygen.

Genius!

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I was talking to a friend recently about my fascination with abandoned places. I’ve alway been interested in them. Even as a little kid I’d stare at old farmhouses, trees growing up around and through them, forgotten in the mists of time. At one time these places were built with a pupose and possibly love, and for whatever reason they were just left to rot, untouched and unsaved. I always wondered why that happened. Anyway, here are 30 photos of places that were, for whatever reason, abandoned. I hope you enjoy them as much as I do.

PS – I’ve posted a couple of these before, but they’re worth a repost.

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Well, do ya?

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I’ve always been fascinated by abandoned places, whether they be houses, cars, or anything really. For instance, there’s something about looking at an old abandoned house and knowing that it was once someone’s dream, a place where maybe kids were running around, a home that somebody took great pride in but now it just sits there, overtaken by nature. Why did they leave? What happened? To me that’s very intriguing.

With that in mind, here are 12 photos of abandoned places that I particularly like. I hope you like them too.

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The good news is that Columbus Blue Jackets goalie Sergei Bobrovsky has a spectacular condo in downtown C-Bus. The bad news is that it’s for sale, possibly meaning he’s signing elsewhere this summer.  Check it out, man. It can be yours for a cool 2.9 million.

Crowded.

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The Anthem Veterans Memorial is a monument located in Anthem, Arizona and was dedicated in 2011 to honor the sacrifice and service made by members of the United States Armed Forces. The memorial’s five white pillars represent the nation’s military branches and are arranged in Department of Defense order of precedence: Army, Marine Corps, Navy, Air Force, and finally Coast Guard. Each pillar has an elliptical opening that slants downward toward The Great Seal of the United States. On Veterans Day the design allows the sun’s rays to spotlight the Great Seal at precisely 11:11 AM. Amazing stuff.

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Stunningly beautiful? Sure. Amazing feat of architecture? No doubt. Cool tourist attraction? Hell yes. Titanic waste of water? Uh, probably.

PS- The people in the rooms below must have a really sucky view. 

PPS- They built this thing in 19-days. China, man.

PPPS- You just know when Trump gets a look at this thing he’ll have to have one in NYC. Maybe they can die the water orange.

What? Why? WHY? Why would anyone enjoy walking across this invitation to death? Wanna die? Sure, head on across, kids! The steps are only every two damn feet apart! Oh, and the bridges often have 100-mph winds! Woot!

PS- Seriously, nope.

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Did you know that people live in abandoned water towers? Because hell yes they do. How cool would that be? I mean seriously? Imagine the views. Take a look at these photos of renovated water towers turned into houses and tell me what you think. I don’t want a water tower house, I need a water tower house.

PS- Lotta stairs, who cares?

PPS- Zombie proof like you read about.

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Well, some of you. If you’re under 30 perhaps not. Anyway, many of us older folk can remember the way old supermarkets looked, as well as the old country, small town stores. What follows is a look back at a simpler time, 20 photographs along with my comments. Point, click and scroll. Do it man.

The Karakoram Highway extends from Pakistan to China and is a sight to behold. It’s the highest paved international road in the world. 810 Pakistani and 82 Chinese workers lost their lives in landslides and falls while building the highway. It has a total length of approximately 800-miles. It was started in 1959 and was completed 27-years later, in 1986. On a related note, I don’t think I’d be entirely comfortable driving on it. Chills, man.

Stellar soundtrack. Check out some photos. Click and scroll, kids.

I swear I didn’t know China and Pakistan shared a border, but here ya go.

Japan, man. They’ve come a long way since the that little incident back in ’45. Check out these great ideas from the Land of the Rising Sun.

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Cool. Click to scroll through the pics.

I came across a pretty fascinating story the other day from the late 1920s, and it involved . . . wait for it . . . floating airports. But let’s start at the beginning . . .

Back in 1927, there was a cat named Charles Lindbergh who was the first to sail across the Atlantic Ocean all by his lonesome. You may have heard of him. Anywho, before this accomplishment nobody had ever even thought about traveling overseas with an airplane as a means of transportation. However, after Lindbergh’s flight folks started seeing things a little differently. One of these people was an inventor by the name of Edward Armstrong.

First, you should know that when Lindbergh made his flight in the Spirit of St. Louis, over half its take-off weight was gasoline. It was essential that you turn your plane into a flying gas tank in order to have enough fuel to make it.

Note: When Burt Rutan’s airplane Voyager circled the world nonstop in 1986, its takeoff weight was eighty percent fuel.

Anyway, because of the whole weight and distance problem it was thought that crossing the Atlantic wouldn’t be feasible. Then along came Armstrong, who actually had a plan in the works years before Lindbergh’s flight.

Here’s the deal – Armstrong planned to build floating airports, called seadromes, across the Atlantic. A seadrome was to weigh fifty-thousand tons and have an 1,100-foot-long deck. Its flotation system would extend about 180-feet into the water. To hold it in place, Armstrong went to John A. Roebling and Sons. Roebling had invented wound-steel cable, and his company had built the Brooklyn Bridge 40-years earlier. Now they designed a deep-water anchoring system for Armstrong.

And get this – each seadrome would include a 40-room hotel, café, lounge, bar, and other cool stuff.

Finally, on October 22nd, 1929, the New York Times announced that construction of the first seadrome would begin within 60-days. This was actually happening, man. People were pumped.

Alas, seven days later on what we now call Black Tuesday the stock market crashed, the Great Depression was upon us, and Armstrong’s grand scheme went to hell.

Of course, the advancement in technology regarding airplanes rendered all this meaningless anyway within a few years and Armstrong’s plan of floating airports vanished in the mists of time.

PS- The Japanese actually built a 1-kilometer-long floating airport in 1999. They called it Megafloat. That’s cool, man.

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Japanese Megafloat.

It was a different time. In many ways better, in some ways not.

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Progress can be a real pain in the ass, ya know? Especially when developers are constructing giant skyscrapers all up in your business and whatnot. And even though the big boys are throwing money at you left and right in an effort to get you to sell, sometimes folks just don’t wanna leave the old homestead. What follows are some of the most stubborn, hard-headed badasses that refused to cave in to big business. And you know what? You can’t help but respect them. Take a look:

Let’s start with Miss Edith Macefield, who refused to sell her humble abode even though she was offered a cool $1,000,000 for it. Fun fact: This house was the inspiration for the movie “Up”. Cool.

Next up we have some dude named Randal Acker. Randall refused to sell his little house in downtown Portland so they built a huge Portland State University Residence Hall around it. Crazy stuff.

Here’s a couple homeowners who stood strong as some jackass developers built around them. Doesn’t look like they have much of a backyard.

Check out this one in Melbourne, Australia. It was actually protected by the government so it was incorporated into the design of the new building. Crazy, man.

Here’s one from Guangzhou, where the authorities had to build the highway around some buildings because three families wouldn’t move. Impressive.

Finally, we have this gem. The house was a duplex in Toronto and one owner wanted to sell, the other not so much. Incredibly, this is the end result.

Like owning a flying car or everyone soaring around with jetpacks, floating cities and underwater cities have been talked about for years. Well, looks like the first floating city will arrive in 2020. Read on . . .

The concept of floating cities may sound like something from a science fiction novel, but it could become a reality by 2020. Seasteading Institute, a San Francisco-based nonprofit has been developing this idea since the foundation of the organization in 2008, and it has reached an agreement with the government of French Polynesia to begin testing in its waters.
“If you could have a floating city, it would essentially be a start-up country,” Joe Quirk, the president of the Seasteading Institute told the New York Times. “We can create a huge diversity of governments for a huge diversity of people.” The community in question should consist of about a dozen structures, including homes, hotels, offices, and restaurants. Engineers and architects have already visited an undisclosed location where the project should emerge. The main aim of the idea is to “liberate humanity from politicians” and “rewrite the rules that govern society”.

Liberate schmiberate. How hard would it be to conquer a floating city? Please. Just send some Navy Seals under the place and harpoon the hell out of the place. Seriously, I like the concept but I’d build it as a resort or something and charge rich people a gazillion bucks to visit. Anywho, take a look:

Located in the Binhai Cultural District In Tianjin, the five-story library is called “The Eye of Binhai”. It covers 34,000 square meters and can hold up to 1.2 million books. Taking just three years to complete, the library features a reading area on the ground floor, lounge areas in the middle sections and offices, meeting spaces, and computer/audio rooms at the top. Check out the video below the photos for more awesomeness. On a related note, I have no idea how they reach the books on those upper shelves.

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Yep, that’s an underwater restaurant. A company called Snøhetta has designed a three-level structure with a 36-foot-wide panoramic window that allows visitors to “journey” under the sea in southern Norway. At first viewing it looks like a concrete container but inside it’s several kinds of awesome. The restaurant will be called “Under” and have the space to fit up to 100-guests, and will even double as a marine research centre when no one is dining because Norwegians are awesome. This bad boy is set to open in 2019. On a related note, Norway, man.

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Fort Boyard is a fort off the west coast of France. Though a fort on Boyard bank was suggested as early as the 17th century, it was not until the 1800s under Napoleon Bonaparte that work began. Building started in 1801 and was completed in 1857. Check out the photos as well as the video down below. Cool stuff.

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Ornate.

Wondrous.

Richard Nuetra was born in Austria on April 8, 1892 and moved to the United States in 1923. He became a naturalized citizen in 1929, and worked briefly for famed architect Frank Lloyd Wright. Eventually he became famous for a style you’ll all recognize, and it became known as the Neutra Design.

His design popularity hit its apex in the 60’s and is still widely emulated today.

As you look at these designs, remember what most architecture looked like back in the early 20th century, or maybe the house you grew up in. This is decidedly different. The open spaces, the crisp lines, the glass, the airy and breezy feel, I love it.

Let’s take a look. Click on a photo, then scroll through the collection:

If I could have any house I wanted it would be a Neutra house. Love everything about it. How about you? Anyway, Richard Nuetra was certainly a man ahead of his time, but we’ve just about caught up, right?

(CNN) One architecture firm hopes to create the longest building in the world by bending a skyscraper in half.

The Big Bend is a curved, 4,000 foot-long skyscraper planned on Manhattan’s Billionaire’s Row. It’s the brainchild of Oiio Studio.

It’s no secret that there is a space issue in Manhattan. Architects build up because there is no room to build out.

“If we manage to bend our structure instead of bending the zoning rules of New York, we would be able to create one of the most prestigious buildings in Manhattan,” reads the building proposal on Oiio’s website.

The designer of the project, Ioannis Oikonomou, was inspired to create the U-shaped structure after learning that a company created an elevator that not only moves vertically, but also horizontally.

What the hell, man? How does this work exactly? I’m confused. On one hand it looks cool as hell, on the other it freaks me out a little. On a related note, that thing looks like it could fall over in a stiff westerly breeze. Good God.